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17 discussions filed under “The Conspirator”

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“Mary Surratt - Guilty, Innocent, or does it matter?”

Apr 20, 2011 at 9:41pm | Filed Under “The Conspirator

Mary Surratt - Guilty, Innocent, or does it matter?
Less than three months after her arrest at her boarding house on H Street in Washington City, Mary Surratt would be hanged for her role in John Wilkes Booth's murderous plot.
from The Conspirator 54 comments

“Frederick Aiken: A Proper Defense”

Mar 14, 2011 at 9:41pm | Filed Under “The Conspirator

Frederick Aiken: A Proper Defense
Historian Fred Borch argues that Frederick Aiken (James McAvoy) did all that he could and provided a proper defense for Mary Surratt.
from The Conspirator 23 comments

“Edwin Stanton: Hero, Villain, or Something Else?”

Feb 25, 2011 at 6:40pm | Filed Under “The Conspirator

Edwin Stanton: Hero, Villain, or Something Else?
Edwin Stanton reportedly said when Abraham Lincoln died, "Now he belongs to the ages." Unfortunately the ages have been a lot kinder to the 16th president than they have to the war secretary.
from The Conspirator 45 comments

“Historians View the Assassination”

Apr 4, 2011 at 9:36pm | Filed Under “The Conspirator

Historians View the Assassination
In April of 1865 most northerners had little trouble discerning who was behind the assassination; they were convinced the Confederate government was involved.
from The Conspirator 87 comments

“Brig. Gen. Joseph Holt - His Role as Chief Prosecutor in the Military Tribunal”

Mar 28, 2011 at 8:43pm | Filed Under “The Conspirator

Brig. Gen. Joseph Holt - His Role as Chief Prosecutor in the Military Tribunal
Joseph Holt, a Kentucky lawyer and staunch Unionist, was confirmed by the Congress as President Lincoln's Judge Advocate General on September 3, 1862. This made Holt the top lawyer in the Army, and the principal legal advisor to Lincoln on all military legal matters.
from The Conspirator 73 comments

COMMENTS

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  • fred_borch
    01/20/2011 at 9:18am

    fred_borch

    My facts are not quite right on Lincoln's funeral -- and I regret the error! This is what I should have written -- the funeral procession of President Lincoln visited 11 cities and over 1 million people filed past his coffin. And on April 19, 1865, an estimated 25 million Americans attended memorial services for Abraham Lincoln in Washington City and around the country. So my claim that 10 million people turned out to watch Lincoln's funeral procession as it moved by train is wrong. That said, for one million Americans to file past Lincoln's coffin is incredible if you consider that the population of the United States was 31 million in 1861. And for 25 million to attend memorial services is truly remarkable --

    from April 1865: Lincoln, Washington City, and the Civil War's End
  • fred_borch
    01/20/2011 at 6:06am

    fred_borch

    Did you know that --- when Lincoln died on April 15, Secretary of War Edwin Stanton muttered "Now he belongs to the ages." Or did he? Perhaps Stanton really said "Now he belongs to the angels." Last year, Adam Gopnik wrote a fascinating article in "The New Yorker" about this historical mystery. It's worth reading ...

    from April 1865: Lincoln, Washington City, and the Civil War's End
  • fred_borch
    01/20/2011 at 6:04am

    fred_borch

    Did you know that --- some 10 million Americans turned out to watch Lincoln's funeral procession as it moved by train from Washington City to Springfield. Since the U.S. population had been 31 in 1860, this is a huge number --- in 2011, it would be as if 100 million Americans had taken to the streetsto mourn the beloved president.

    from April 1865: Lincoln, Washington City, and the Civil War's End
  • AJCameron
    01/19/2011 at 11:28am

    AJCameron

    To historymaddog's point about legislation: perhaps a good example of the acts passed by the Union during the Civil War that had lasting economic effects on the rates of growth in the North and South, respectively, is the National Banking Act. This is legislation that would never have seen the light of day if the South had been part of the lawmaking process. Its immediate necessity arose from the need to finance the Union effort, but its lasting effect when combined with a 10% tax on state banks was to create an interest rate differential that favored the North for most of thirty-five years. The result was that credit was both scarce and expensive for the Southern economy at a time when it was going through a period when it was transitioning from the plantation economy, revolutionizing its labor model, and attempting to rebuild its infrastructure.

    from April 1865: Lincoln, Washington City, and the Civil War's End
  • fred_borch
    01/18/2011 at 8:18pm

    fred_borch

    There is no question that the end of slavery wrecked the South's economy---as much of the region's wealth was tied up in the slave system. And there is no question that the North's victory meant a shift of political power from the South --- at least until the political compromise of 1877. Historymaddog raises a very interesting point: did the South's defeat somehow accelerate industrialization in America? I don't know. Anyone?

    from April 1865: Lincoln, Washington City, and the Civil War's End
Prev 1 ... 80 81 82 83 84 85 Next

“Historians View the Assassination”

87 commentsNov 17, 2009 at 4:00pm

In April of 1865 most northerners had little trouble discerning who was behind the assassination; they were convinced the Confederate government was involved. More

“Brig. Gen. Joseph Holt - His Role as Chief Prosecutor in the Military Tribunal”

73 commentsNov 17, 2009 at 4:00pm

Joseph Holt, a Kentucky lawyer and staunch Unionist, was confirmed by the Congress as President Lincoln's Judge Advocate General on September 3, 1862. This made Holt the top lawyer in the Army, and the principal legal advisor to Lincoln on all military legal matters. More

“Slavery, race, and the assassination”

56 commentsNov 17, 2009 at 4:00pm

On the evening of April 11, 1865, a large crowd gathered on the south lawn of the White House in Washington to hear President Abraham Lincoln deliver a speech from a second-floor balcony... More
 

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