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“Mary Surratt - Guilty, Innocent, or does it matter?”

Apr 20, 2011 at 9:41pm | Filed Under “The Conspirator

Mary Surratt - Guilty, Innocent, or does it matter?
Less than three months after her arrest at her boarding house on H Street in Washington City, Mary Surratt would be hanged for her role in John Wilkes Booth's murderous plot.
from The Conspirator 53 comments

“Frederick Aiken: A Proper Defense”

Mar 14, 2011 at 9:41pm | Filed Under “The Conspirator

Frederick Aiken: A Proper Defense
Historian Fred Borch argues that Frederick Aiken (James McAvoy) did all that he could and provided a proper defense for Mary Surratt.
from The Conspirator 23 comments

“Edwin Stanton: Hero, Villain, or Something Else?”

Feb 25, 2011 at 6:40pm | Filed Under “The Conspirator

Edwin Stanton: Hero, Villain, or Something Else?
Edwin Stanton reportedly said when Abraham Lincoln died, "Now he belongs to the ages." Unfortunately the ages have been a lot kinder to the 16th president than they have to the war secretary.
from The Conspirator 45 comments

“Historians View the Assassination”

Apr 4, 2011 at 9:36pm | Filed Under “The Conspirator

Historians View the Assassination
In April of 1865 most northerners had little trouble discerning who was behind the assassination; they were convinced the Confederate government was involved.
from The Conspirator 87 comments

“Brig. Gen. Joseph Holt - His Role as Chief Prosecutor in the Military Tribunal”

Mar 28, 2011 at 8:43pm | Filed Under “The Conspirator

Brig. Gen. Joseph Holt - His Role as Chief Prosecutor in the Military Tribunal
Joseph Holt, a Kentucky lawyer and staunch Unionist, was confirmed by the Congress as President Lincoln's Judge Advocate General on September 3, 1862. This made Holt the top lawyer in the Army, and the principal legal advisor to Lincoln on all military legal matters.
from The Conspirator 73 comments

COMMENTS

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  • futureperfect
    04/17/2010 at 12:48pm

    futureperfect

    What about an updated, authentic, big-screen modern-telling of the life of Mark Twain? What an adventurous, fascinating life he led and it would make for a great film. I am not aware of any big screen Twain films in the works. Thoughts?

    from The Best American History Movies NEVER Made
  • Rocco
    04/16/2010 at 8:45pm

    Rocco

    "In Search Of" with Leonard Nimoy had an episode about Butch Cassidy.

    "Butch Cassidy: 5/78 - Examines the possibility that Butch Cassidy was not killed in Bolivia along with the Sundance Kid, but actually lived a full life and died peacefully in 1937."

    from Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid
  • BrianFalk
    04/16/2010 at 3:59pm

    BrianFalk

    Vergennes, I'm a big fan of the idea that the antagonist is simply the protagonist with another point of view, so I appreciate your call for balance on the Braddock story. To be honest, as an American, I've thought of the story more from a young George Washington's point of view. Before finding himself in Braddock's peloton of officers, he was a disgraced militia officer whose earlier blunder in battle at Fort Necessity had forced him to quit the service altogether. His heroism at the Monongahela put him back on a career path that became legendary, of course. But I love the idea of a well-rounded story that may leave a viewer guessing the identity of the bad guy (or even the good guy).

    from The Best American History Movies NEVER Made
  • TAFC_Staff
    04/15/2010 at 6:01pm

    TAFC_Staff

    Hey leeladek,

    It was recently reported that Darren Aronofsky is set to direct a film centering on Jackie Kennedy immediately following the assassination. Rachel Weisz is signed on to star as the First Lady.

    What do you guys think of the project/casting?

    Here's the link.

    from 10 Best American History Movies
  • Vergennes
    04/15/2010 at 2:47pm

    Vergennes

    Braddock's campaign is definitely an interesting topic, but it would need to be told from both points of view. In Québec's school history,the story goes like this: In time of peace, Braddock leads a behemoth towards a French fort, and is defeated by the heroic efforts of both regular soldiers, colonial militia, and especially several hundred Indian allies. It is a classic David vs Goliath story, especially since the French commander was killed at the start.
    The film could tell a truly American story - Québécois are Americans too - with Braddock as the perfidious English villain. The film should avoid a cop-out, as when Master & Commander turns the large American frigate into a non-existent French one. The story also integrates several strands of American history: English colonists, French colonists, and the Indians, and elements such as French and Indian inter-marriage, the Great Peace of Montréal (1701).
    The film could take about a third of the time to show the woodsmen hacking a road through the wilderness and the power of the English army. Some contrast between colonists and English regulars could be underlined. Then, the scene could switch to Fort Duquesne, as news arrives and the French commander makes preparations, with discussions between Indian leaders and the French officers. A large part would go to the meeting engagement, as dramatic a battle as any film-maker could hope. At the end, the camera pans over the bodies, and Washington, effiicient but not a demi-god, organizes the retreat to Virginia.

    from The Best American History Movies NEVER Made

“Historians View the Assassination”

87 commentsNov 17, 2009 at 4:00pm

In April of 1865 most northerners had little trouble discerning who was behind the assassination; they were convinced the Confederate government was involved. More

“Brig. Gen. Joseph Holt - His Role as Chief Prosecutor in the Military Tribunal”

73 commentsNov 17, 2009 at 4:00pm

Joseph Holt, a Kentucky lawyer and staunch Unionist, was confirmed by the Congress as President Lincoln's Judge Advocate General on September 3, 1862. This made Holt the top lawyer in the Army, and the principal legal advisor to Lincoln on all military legal matters. More

“Slavery, race, and the assassination”

56 commentsNov 17, 2009 at 4:00pm

On the evening of April 11, 1865, a large crowd gathered on the south lawn of the White House in Washington to hear President Abraham Lincoln deliver a speech from a second-floor balcony... More
 

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